Dhaka, Bangladesh
Traffic system in a mess

Traffic system in a mess

The capital's messy traffic management system is left to be manually handled by around 3,000 policemen round the clock, making it increasingly difficult for them to enforce traffic rules. With around 173 new motor vehicles hitting the city streets every day, traffic police are often found too exhausted to manage some vital intersections where violations of traffic rules are all too frequent, especially by buses and jaywalkers. Worried, the traffic department says if new roads are not built and Bus Rapid Transit (a lane designated only for bus) or metro rails are not introduced, it will be impossible to control the city traffic. But such infrastructures may not be a reality in the next two years, meaning the capital's traffic system is likely to worsen in the coming days. "It is not possible to strictly enforce traffic rules even if we deploy 10,000 policemen unless new communication infrastructures are developed," said a deputy commissioner (traffic division) of Dhaka Metropolitan Police. Considering its population, Dhaka city must have 25 percent of its total area for roads, according to Prof Shamsul Hoque of Buet.There is a loss incurred of Taka 19,555 due to delays, environmental pollution, freight carriage and transport sector losses, accidents and excess fuel required for traffic jams The roads must have at least two lanes and should be able to accommodate three types of vehicles -- passenger vehicles, ambulances and fire service vehicles -- side by side. But the capital has less than eight percent of its space for roads, and only 2.5 percent of those can accommodate those three types of vehicles side by side. In all, the city has 2,500 kilometres of road, which is too little for some 7.79 lakh motor vehicles, mostly private cars. In addition, there are a few lakh illegal rickshaws and other slow-moving vehicles. The traffic department has already installed traffic boxes at all important intersections so that its personnel can work round the clock in three shifts. Strict enforcement of traffic rules can yield some temporary relief from gridlock, but the job is almost impossible for the police as in many cases the rule breakers rule the system. Vehicles carrying lawmakers and top government officials often come before the queue of vehicles at signals using the lanes meant for left turn only. Then they compel the cops to allow their vehicles to pass, halting the traffic flow of other roads. Secondly, buses frequently stop to pick or drop passengers at intersections, which is strictly forbidden. Rickshaws ply the VIP roads that are off-limits to them; pedestrians cross roads whenever and wherever they like. And the walkways are fully or partially occupied by vendors, bikers, parked cars or construction materials. Syed Masroor Banani, Dhaka Native fish We are said to be Bangalis feeding on fish and rice. Today our protein intake is eighty per cent from fish In the waterbodies of Bangadesh many types of fish are found. But due to more demand and change of time, the availability of fish is decreasing. Also excessive pesticides in agricultural fields is driving away the fish.We have to preserve our native fish. For this more research is required . More water bodies for fish have to be created. The Fisheries department should come forward for undertaking research in multiplication of our fish sources, digging water bodies, and providing food for the fish. The natural sources such as canals and rivers have to be expanded. Kalpana Sarkar Sundarganj, Gaibandha No more hardline How much more of a hardline will the government and the opposition undertake. To slove any problem the government and the opposition are using strict measures including hurting and killing innocent passers-by. But is this method solving problems? The people of the country are looking askance at the government and the opposition because of violent confrontations between them. Even the advice of foreigners like the US and UK are not being heeded to. What will happen to us? Have we all gone mad? We feel that al problems should be solved through discussions between the opposing parties. Md Sharifuddin Tejkuni Para, Dhaka Medical treatment or business? We know that medical treatment is an humanitarian care. But at present the diagonistic clinics with their expensive treatment methods are making a fun of humanitarian motives. The poorer and working classes are being deprived of modern treatment. The government hospitals neglect, the private hospitals expense, where will the common people go? Without medical treatment or treratment by unqualified doctors and nurses will lead to death and disease. Rathindra Nath Shaha Bhola

Share |